ON POETRY, WRITING AND RANDOM CULTURAL MATTERS

Work - I-spy and Shanty

 I-spy and Shanty, is out now from corrupt press. Very exciting this, as it's my first book publication outside the UK. To buy a copy write to me or visit my publisher here.

Launches and readings

Paris at Paris Lit Up Open Mic - 27 February 2014 - Culture Rapide - 20h

Paris at Galerie 43 - 8 March 2014 - 43 rue Vandrezanne, 75013 - 19h

Paris at Chez Grace - 10 March - 46 rue des Abesses, 75018 - 19h30

Paris at Art Brunch in the Marais - 23 March 2014 - 12h

Prague - 10-14 May 2014 - Prague Micro Festival - Monday 12 May

Paris - Upstairs at Duroc at Berkley Books - Wednesday 21 May 19h30

Paris - 16 September 2014 - Poets Live - Carr's Pub 19h30

Reading, UK - 19 September  2014 - Poets' Cafe - 20h30

Paris - 19 November - Berkeley Books - 19h30 corrupt press reading

Paris - 20 March - Berkley Books - 19h30 with Margo Berdeshevsky

Paris - 11 June - Shakespeare and Company - 19h with Margo Berdeshevsky and Cecilia Woloch - click to listen to the podcast


What they are saying about I-spy and Shanty already:

'Kate Noakes' poetry has always treasured vivid language, and does so here - just savour her nectar-sipping bat that 'gigolos away the dark'. But this rich and varied new collection also strikes a new note, as quietly compact as the water-worn stones that appear in several poems, spare but alive with implications, like a whole life in wartime conveyed by 'And now / the kissing away of two long winters. Him here.'

Philip Gross (TS Eliot Prizewinner)




'Kate Noakes is a poet on the road, on the wing, in transit, yet rooted in place, childhood, family, love. She records detail as in a journal, gathering experience, words, traveller’s tales. A pebble is ‘a travelling spot’ that ends as ‘nothing but light’, teller of Earth’s journey. The pebble’s beginning is the poet’s beginning, a child pond-dipping, picking up stones. A memorable poem records her grandfather throwing his medals into the river on his way home from the war, as if horror could be washed away. It survives in his grand-daughter’s imagination, and in her vivid poems.'  

Gillian Clarke (National Poet of Wales)


corrupt press reading at Berkeley Books, Paris, November 2014

























Review from Stride Magazine is here

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